Reddita makes reddit look beautiful on Android 3.0 tablets


It must be reddit week in the Android developers cabal. Hot on the heels of the launch of BaconReader for Android phones, a developer has released Reddita, a reddit app for Honeycomb tablets.

Reddit is a social news web site which allows users to submit links to news items, pictures, or just about anything. Visitors vote on stories so that only the best make it to the front page, and the comments section for each post is (almost) always fascinating reading.

If there’s one major down side to reddit though, it’s that the web site is only a step above Craigslist when it comes to site design. It looks like it was designed in the 1990s, and the user interface is especially difficult to navigate on a touchscreen tablet. Reddita fixes that, making reddit more fun to browser on a tablet than a desktop web browser.

The app lets you login with your reddit credentials to see your profile, friends, and messages. You can also enable alerts so that your tablet will let you know when new items show up in your inbox.

The real fun takes place when you visit the home page and click on an article. The image or web site will open in a window on the right side of the screen while you can see a list of stories on the left. You can also click the comment button to see what people are saying about a story, and respond to comments or leave your own from within an app.

Of course you can also vote stories or comments up or down and submit your own items from within the app. Unfortunately, like BaconReader, Reddita doesn’t appear to work with Android’s default sharing menu, so you can’t surf the web in the default web browser and then send a link to Reddita.

You can check out a brief hands-on video showing some of the features below, and you can find more information at reddit.

Reddita is available as a free download from the Android Market. There’s also an ad-free version for about $1.61.

Brad Linder

Brad Linder is editor of Liliputing and Mobiputing. He's been tinkering with mobile tech for decades and writing about it since 2006. Brad has also worked with NPR, WHYY, PRI, and AOL.

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